Undergraduate Course Details

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Arch 1112
Arch 1124
Arch 1131
Arch 1133
Arch 1166
Hum 1171
Hum 1173
Soc 1171
Arch 1212
Arch 1224
Arch 1231
Arch 1233
Arch 1262
CE 1252
Soc1271
Arch 2112
Arch 2124
Arch 2141
Arch 2143
Arch 2145
Arch 2161
Arch 2166
CE 2151
Arch 2212
Arch 2224
Arch 2231
Arch 2233
Arch 2262
Arch 2266
CE 2251
Arch 3112
Arch 3124
Arch 3131
Arch 3141
Arch 3143
Arch 3151
CE 3156
CE 3166
Arch 3212
Arch 3231
Arch 3241
Arch 3261
Arch 3262
CE 3256
URP 3243
Arch 4112
Arch 4124
Arch 4141
Arch 4143
Arch 4145
Arch 4147
Arch 4162
ES 4161
Arch 4212
Arch 4241
Arch 4243
Arch 4263
Arch 4266
URP 4224
URP 4261
Arch 5112
Arch 5162
Arch 5163
Arch 5166
Arch 5168
DS 5161
ES 5161
Arch 5212
Arch 5224
Arch 5261
Arch 1112 Design Fundamentals 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Non-human approaches to making things. A series of projects guide students to analyze the behaviour of non-human actors, elements and patterns to develop critical understanding of the various ways of making things in nature. In doing so, these projects help students to develop capacities of spatial organization of forms, analyze their relationship, and strive for exploring a 'situated' order. Special emphasis is given on the relationship between ‘phenomenon’ and aesthetics. Various hand-drawn and computer aided techniques for presentation and communication are used. Course Objectives: 1. Introduce students to design as a context-dependent act. 2. Assist students develop greater understanding of/on the question of making. 3. Enable students to assess critically the question of aesthetics and understand the structure of making. 4. Demonstrate the fundamentals of aesthetics (and space) not as objective, universal and normative approaches, but as subjective, relative and context-bou
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to, 1. Appraise the structure of making things in nature toward their greater understanding. 2. Develop skills of discovery, rather than being trained into a particular mode of aesthetics and order. 3. Create spatial organization of forms (compositions), but through a critical understanding of the structure of making and hence to relate ‘phenomenon’ into the creation of objects. 4. Apply different tools/methods/techniques of visual communication - both human and computer-aided.
Arch 1124 Visual Communication Basics 4.5 Credit
Section A: Course content: The subject is designed to equip students with a range of basic visual communication tools and the fundamentals of graphic design as a means to describe space visually. Students acquire foundation skills to explore a range of communication techniques including computing, drawing, freehand illustration, model making and written and verbal presentation. Course Objectives: 1. To familiarizes student with the basic communication tools for architectural representation and exploration 2. To introduce basic techniques of physical and digital model-making as a means to describe space visually. 3. Enhance student ability to present representational outcomes as a cohesive set of documents verbally and visually.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course students will acquire: 1. Ability to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of ways including oral, written, visual, physical and digital. 2. Ability to demonstrate basic skills in the techniques of digital and/or analogue drawing as a tool for architectural representation and exploration. 3. Ability to demonstrate basic skills in the techniques of physical and/or digital model-making as a device for exploration and presentation 4. Ability to position work within practice and an extended disciplinary context.
Arch 1131 Introduction to Architectural Thinking 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Identify how architecture and its composition, representation, making and materiality has been shaped by technological, social, political, economic, geographic and cultural forces, and by multiple and conflicting “disciplines” of architecture, not a single history of a unified praxis. Course Objectives: 1.To introduce the language of architectural criticism and interpretation. 2.The course will be organized thematically, with examples drawn from a range of historical periods as well as contemporary practice. 3.To develop an understanding of architectural thinking through analysis of form, function, and context, as exemplified in given texts and through particular built examples. 4.To explored thematically by focusing upon a series of significant debates (historical and contemporary) about tectonics, program, representation, and urbanism. Debates will include history versus utopia, handcrafted versus machine made, generic versus iconic, form versus program, drawing versus scripting
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: Students who successfully complete this course will be able to: 1. Visually categorize major architectural modes of representation. 2. Synthesize the defining characteristics of buildings using formal and technical vocabulary 3 Criticize that “architectural thinking” does not happen in a vacuum. Rather, it reflects and influences changes in the larger society. 4. Critically evaluate the ideas and theories in the history of architecture.
Arch 1133 Architecture of Bengal 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Examines architectural history of Bengal as socio-political and cultural expression from the earliest to more recent times. A number of issues and values will be explored through theoretical essays, critical writings and lecture presentations that expose the diversity of architectural styles and practices of Bengal. This course considers the unique deltaic characteristics of Bengal, and aims to furnish students with a set of questions, techniques, and tools for criticism and self- critique. Course Objectives: 1. To investigate socio-political and cultural changes of Bengal and its impact on architecture. 2. To explore the unique characteristic of Bengal architecture base on its deltaic cultural landscape. 3. To search for the identity of Bengal architecture and values that traditional practices within various time frames.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Analyze the built fabric of Bengal architecture and its spaces produced over a long period of time. 
 2. Differentiate contemporary thoughts and architectures from architecture of the past. 
 3. Develop analytical skills in formal and conceptual approaches to architectural identity of Bengal. 4. Interpret geo-climatic and socio-political forces behind the design, and the process of creating uniqueness of Bengal architecture.
Arch 1166 Vernacular Architecture and Settlements Lab 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Historical survey of vernacular architectural forms in various regions of Bangladesh, with attention to local construction technology and materials. Issues discussed include the relationship of house form and culture. Course Objectives: 1. To introduce traditional settlement pattern and architecture of the various parts of the country. 2. To expose students to the old aged traditional practice of building construction and technology. 3. To explore the local adaptation practice in build environment.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Explore the architectural identity of Bangladesh. 2. Evaluate the local building technology and materials. 3. Have knowledge of the settlement planning of the settlements in various parts of the country. 4. Innovate and evaluate traditional building form and technology.
Hum 1171 Communicative English 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The course is designed to develop all five skills, including listening, reading, speaking, writing and interacting. Through spontaneous speaking tasks on their personal and social experience of architecture and through critical reading & discussion of selected texts, students will focus on the language needed to express their views on architectural issues. Course Objectives: 1. Develop effective communication skills to assert, discuss and interact both in academic and professional environment. 2. Enable student to express their views on architectural issues in a structured way 3. Introduce student with the academic style of English.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course students will have learned to: 1. Understanding elements of academic style 2. Academic grammar and vocabulary 3. Reading, navigating and deconstructing long and difficult texts 4. Training and improving note-taking skills 5. Summarizing and synthesizing ideas in writing and speaking 6. Planning outlines, drafting and writing subject-specific text types 7. Discussing and presenting ideas/arguments in seminars 8. Experimenting with study skills and productivity techniques
Hum 1173 Independent Bangladesh: political and cultural history 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Bangladesh is a country in South Asia bordering the Bay of Bengal to the South, India to the West and North, and Myanmar to the Southeast. British India was partitioned by joint leaders of the Congress, all India-Muslim League and Britain in 1947, creating the commonwealth realms of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan (which had two geographically and culturally separated regions: one is West Pakistan and the other is East Pakistan―currently Bangladesh) and a Republic of India. Broadly, the division was made based on following the diversity of socio-cultural and religious practices; however, the political jurisdiction behind the separation particularly between the two parts of Pakistan didn’t reflect this canon but opposed the preventing strong socio cultural practices in Bangladesh. Rather, the politics of the West part imposed their culture and power the East that intended to ruin the thousand years’ history of East Pakistan. The conflict in term of social equity and power was evident.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To learn the long history of socio-cultural practices, affected after the separation of Pakistan and India. 2. To discuss the acute challenges that the locals encountered because of only the single socio-political jurisdictions over two culturally and geographically separate regions: East and West Pakistan. 3. To understand the conflicts on socio-cultural and political practices prevailed in East Pakistan (now Bangladesh) during 1947-1971 Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Appreciate the history behind the liberation war and the independence of Bangladesh. 2. Understand the socio cultural and political foundation of a new nation. 3. Explain the political and cultural standpoint of independence Bangladesh to help new generation relay the true history.
Soc 1171 Art, Culture and Society 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: What have been the major issues in the theory and practice of architectural design through time and across cultures, and how is aesthetic judgment related to more general systems of ordering within a particular society or group in the context of rapid social and cultural change? What are the relations of architecture and for example, with economic and political systems, kinship and descent, family structure, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, religion and belief systems, the effects of colonialism, industrialization, and globalization under the influence of market economy? These key questions are asked around the relationship between a society and the forms it creates. This course draws upon concepts, methods, and findings mainly from the field of social and cultural anthropology to address these questions. It encourages students to learn about different societies and cultures in order to make sense of their own as cases and examples are drawn from a wide range of architectural practic
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. Establish a perspective of the role and influence of architecture in society and vis-a-vis other disciplines in the arts and science. 2. Develop an understanding of how architecture is shaped by and reflects cultural values and social organization. 3. Present a broad picture of socio-cultural issues which influence architectural design. 4. Understand how global cultures create environments that both reflect and shape their values. Intended Learning Outcomes: 1. Acknowledge the role of architecture as a stage, an instrument and/or an outcome pertaining to the notions of ethnicity, gender, class, globalism, kinship, social structure etc. 2. Be introduced to the richness and variety of human cultures across societies in the past and contemporary worlds through students’ encounter with the varieties of architectural design concepts the societies produce. 3. Learn about different theories of culture, social identity, economic entities, political systems and other forms of social
Arch 1212 Basic Architectural Design 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Human approaches to making things. As in the previous term, a series of projects analyze intensions of human actors to develop a critical understanding of the various thoughts and ways of making things including music, painting and artefacts. Exercises are carried out to transform and relate those in the making of space, both in 2-D and 3-D. Experiments are conducted with various indigenous architectural materials including mud, bamboo and brick to explore their properties which show ways to the production of space. Both manual and computer aided tools for addressing similar questions are further explored. Course Objectives: 1. Introduce students to design as a context-dependent act. 2. Assist students develop greater understanding of/on the question of making. 3. Enable students to assess critically the question of aesthetics and understand the structure of making. 4. Demonstrate the fundamentals of aesthetics (and space) not as objective, universal and normative approaches, but a
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: 1. Critically comprehend the question of aesthetics and space. 2. Relate the human-made-space and aesthetics to phenomenon. 3. Apply computer assisted design tools to understand, produce and experiment with virtual methods of ‘making’. 4. Demonstrate visual, spatial and ideological sensibilities with emphasis on the grasping ideas and concepts behind human-made objects. Comprehend the whole spectrum of design, from primary intentions to detailed interpretation and prepare for the second year by establishing a critical approach to design-thinking.
Arch 1224 Advanced Visual Communication 4.5 Credit
Section A: Couse content: Study and application of essential design communication tools for formal and spatial studies, color, light and shadow, projections, physical model building and 3D computer modelling, life drawing, and perspective. They investigate approaches and techniques to manage, manipulate and envision information, using various computer software to link photography, drawing and other media. Course Objectives: 1. To enable student to use the digital communication tools in design process. 2. To develop computer aided design skills to comprehend, produce and experiment with design activities 3. Enhance student’s ability to produce representational documents using various media. 4. Enhance students Ability to apply communication techniques (digital and/or manual), knowledge and understanding to practical applications in architecture
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this subject students will have achieved the following: 1. Ability to think critically through multiple representational skills, a capacity to develop and communicate a line of design thinking and to verbally and/or graphically convey the formal consequences of this thinking. 2. Ability to demonstrate skills in the techniques of digital and/or analogue drawing as a tool for architectural representation and exploration. 3. Ability to demonstrate skills in the techniques of physical and/or digital model-making as a device for exploration and presentation 4. Ability to present representational outcomes as a cohesive set of documents verbally and/or visually. 5. Ability to work coherently and collaboratively within a group setting 6. Ability to produce inspirational responses that exemplify integration of learning experiences 7. Ability to apply communication techniques (digital and/or manual), knowledge and understanding to practical application
Arch 1231 Basic Design Theory 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Knowledge of many of the geometric principles, concepts and perspectives underlying structure and form in art and design can be sourced in ancient times, and transcend the boundaries between art, design, science and engineering. Structure, form and performance continue to be of paramount importance in the modern world. An understanding of what nature builds at the nano level can inspire humans to create astonishing tilings, patterns and other forms of visual expression as well as grand macro-level. Course Objectives: 1. To introduce a range of concepts and principles of importance to the understanding of structure and form in the visual arts and design. 2. To create an awareness of how different concepts can, with insight and vision, be used as problem solving tools of the twenty-first century. 3. To explore and apply the elements and principles of design, developing an awareness of its application within our environment. 4. To discover the fundamentals of design, the design process, a
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Show evidence of having gained an awareness of a wide range of theoretical issues of importance to the understanding of the nature of structure and form in the visual arts and design. 2. Conduct structural analyses of naturally occurring phenomena, human-made objects, images, paintings, sculpture, patterns, tilings and other forms of two- and three-dimensional designs and other visual statements. 3. Understand principle of minimum inventory and maximum diversity. 4. Analyze and reflect upon data collected in the human environment. 5. Evaluate the feasibility of potential design solutions.
Arch 1233 Architecture of the World 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The history of the built environment as social and cultural expression from the earliest to more recent times. Themes, theories, and ideas in architecture and urban design are explored, beginning with the earliest written records. Course Objectives: 1. To introduce significant examples of world architecture, concentrating on characteristics of structure, materials, and use. 2. To investigates the ways in which architecture serves as an integral part of cultural, socioeconomic, and political development in cultures around the world. 3. To explore the history of art and architectural works, the shifting attitudes towards their interpretation, and the geopolitical pressures on their appearance, preservation, and disappearance.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Describe world architecture in technical or theoretical terms with proficiency 
 2. Describe particular historical developments of architecture in their wider context 
 3. Analyze architecture works critically through graphic analysis of form and composition 4. Understand the social and cultural contexts of architecture.
Arch 1262 Film, Photography and Media 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course explores various crossings between the arts of film, photography and architecture to illuminate episodes in media history and theory. The course will consider cinema’s architectural qualities: the specific capacity of film to construct, organize, and sequence space, and to move spectators dynamically through space in time. It will examine the work of directors and photographers whose works are strongly interested in architecture, design, and transformations of the built environment, as well as the work of architects and designers who have worked in and with film/photography, and have embedded their architecture and design practice in various cultures of the moving/still image. The course will explore the relationship between photographers, directors, art directors, and production designers in the construction of photographic and cinematic architecture. The students will study films and photographs that foreground important works of architecture. They will consider the role of f
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To understand the relationship of built environment with a variety of disciplines and fields including film, photography and media 2. To consider the role of film and multimedia in the artistic construction of immersive environments 3. To explore the relationship between photographers, directors, art directors, and production designers in the construction of photographic and cinematic architecture. Intended Learning Outcomes: After completion of the course students are expected to 1. Interpret and dissect the relationship of built environment with film, photography and media 2. Analyze the role of film and multimedia in the artistic construction 3. Appraise the work of directors and photographers, and investigate strategies and concepts for understanding film and photography’s relationship to the built environment.
CE 1252 Introduction to Building Construction and Technology 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course provides the fundamental knowledge and concepts for components and construction of buildings. Topics cover structural elements and building envelopes including the materials and installation technology. The course comprises of 6 hours sessional works per week. Site visit is an essential part of this course. Course Objectives: 1. To explain how a building stands up and what is the role of architects in building construction process 2. To identify the function of essential elements and structural components of a building including the materials used and their advantages/disadvantages.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: The students can expect to 1. Detect the roles of key parties in a building process 2. Explain the physical properties and environmental impact of building materials 3. Outline technical drawing, building types and building enclosure 4. Associate the function of different structural components and detect their role/importance in a building 5. Demonstrate experimentation with conventional construction materials in a design exercise 6. Investigate and judge how material choice and detail design can feedback into the overall design of a building
Soc1271 Cultural Anthropology 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Architectural Anthropology presents an alternative approach to looking at architecture and other forms of space-making, and provides a framework to critically assess its historical, cultural and social significance. It aims to indicate the value of this approach on the contemporary production and consumption of all forms of architecture, in the context of current challenges posed by globalization, modernization and environmental change. It assumes a position in favor of a more complex understanding of the processes through which human beings manipulate and produce meaningful form and space. In addition to studying relevant scientific, cognitive, social and anthropological theories of space, it also gives equal focus on the various methods of investigation. In line with this, it advocates first hand investigation of the built environment according to particular themes and place-types. Students are therefore required to engage in a short but intense research in a selected urban location of thei
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. Question the notion of ‘form’ and ‘space’ as abstract, objective categories that under modern condition are conceptualized in a universal manner. 2. Equip students to conduct a design exercise based on information collected from the cultural reading of space-making practices by a particular society. 3. Acquaint students with alternative tools appropriate for design investigation and communication in a culture-sensitive way. Intended Learning Outcomes: 1. Develop the ability to recognize, critically evaluate and apply key concepts within the area of Architectural Anthropology 2. Gain insights on the different aspects of the architectural process e.g. context analysis, conceptualization, problem awareness and engagement, ethics and personal imagination. 3. Develop frameworks to carry out complex cultural-theoretical analysis of architecture and other forms of space-making 4. Learn to use specific tools to conceive of the potential role of architecture as shaping, decon
Arch 2112 Simple Architectural Design 6 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Concentration is on ‘the building’, what it means to have or assert a proposition with architectural integrity, while respecting various aspects of the built environment including, but not limited to, human scale, climate, circulation, behaviour and health. Micro-scale examples of vernacular and ‘evolved’ architecture (i.e. tea stalls) produced within local conditions/contexts of ‘contested-ness’, ‘scarcity, ‘exclusion’ and ‘segregation’ are studied. Such spaces are viewed as a production of the everyday negotiation and conflict between actors. This helps students to understand unique ways of appropriation and transformation of built environment within the broader context of Khulna and similar cities. Theoretically these approaches of study are located within the broader conceptual frameworks of Social Space, Spatial Agency and Indigenous Modernity. Course Objectives: 1. Focus and learn about grasping architectural ideas from wherever sources they are found.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: 1. Develop critical functional understanding on the production of space. 2. Demonstrate capacity for designing environment-responsive architectural form. 3. Apprehend the relationship between situations and organization. 4. Formulate key concepts through arguments and deliberations. 5. Use working knowledge and basic understanding of architectural research techniques. 6. Acquire skills to grasp the nature and practice of (local) making architecture in its context. 7. Assume a critical approach to design, developing original insights and framing key lessons in the process.
Arch 2124 Digital Tools for Architecture 3 Credit
Section A: Couse content: Introduction to digital modeling as well as principles of digital fabrication. Exploration of digital tools with an emphasis on building information modeling (BIM), parametric modeling, and interoperability including special topics in Architecture/Engineering/Construction (AEC) and sustainable design. Course Objectives: 1. Enhance student’s ability to use the digital tools that will help them showcasing their ideas and designs. 2. To familiarizes students with the principles of 2D and 3D techniques and apply them to studio work 3. Equipped student with all the necessary skills expected in architectural practices
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course students will have learned to: 1. Evaluate the potential and limitations of digital tools in the field of Architecture 2. Develop a good knowledge of the use of digital tools and acquired a 'digital craft' specifically applied to the field of Architecture 3. Acquired experience of integrating digital and traditional techniques in the production of a portfolio 4. Communicate effectively by means of digital skills
Arch 2141 Climate and Design 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Investigation of global climatic factors that determine regional climate. Study of tropical climate classifications and their characteristics. Identify relationship between regional climate and site climate. Understanding concept of thermal comfort and its criteria in different climatic and cultural condition.Comparative analysis between passive control and active control of climate in architecture and the difference between internally and externally loaded building types.Calculation of heat flow rate through different building materials and building envelops.Draw relationship of built form with sun, wind and precipitation to identify design strategies.Study of climatic design examples and learn design objectives in different tropical climates. Comprehend climatic design methods and procedures.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. Students will learn the properties of climates and their variation in the global, regional and local perspective. 2. Students will be competent to identify significance of passive climatic control and the point where and when mechanical control (active means) is necessary for the desired thermal condition. 3. Make a clear conception about thermal comfort and its criteria in different climatic context. 4. Familiarize the students with the tools and techniques of passive climatic design. 5. Inspire students to undertake higher research in the field of thermal environment and thermal comfort. Intended Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to -- 1. Analyze a climate for the sake of passive climatic control during architectural design. 2. Recognize the factors of climate, which are responsible for thermal comfort and discomfort in particular cases. 3. Identify special features of a climate that are to be considered with special care in the built environment design. 4. Calculat
Arch 2143 Architecture and Human Behavior 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The physical environment affects the realization of human and organizationalpotential including health, safety, comfort, productivity and satisfaction. Understanding organizational and human needs is no less critical than understandingfinancial, technological and aesthetic factors influencing the planning, design, and management of our physical surroundings.Organizational culture, goals, and structure help shape building design and use.The planning, design, and management of good environments require consideration of all users. Course Objectives: 1. To examine the complex relationship between human behavior and the built environment. 2. To identify social and cultural norms and how they may vary from the user to the designer and are relevant to design decisions. 3. To explore design needs and how they may vary for different socio-economic populations. 4. To explore human life cycles and ranges in physical ability and how these may affect user needs.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Explore the built environment and design problems from human behavioural points of view. 2. Evaluate the knowledge of other cultures and their architectural practice. 3. Explore the planning, design, and management of good environments require consideration of all users. 4. Learn about a range of research and problem solving methods that are available to designers Explore multidimensional spatial experiences through an understanding of design elements, such as circulation, materials, lighting and acoustics.
Arch 2145 Design Ethnography 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course fosters an in-depth understanding of the socio-cultural context as a way of improving the relevance and quality of design by drawing upon examples from the built environment. Students explore ethnographic research methods for understanding people in their everyday and episodic lives as a way of gaining insights on what matters most in design. It asks the researcher, to share firsthand the environment, problems, language, rituals and social relations of a particular group or community of people. It requires an immersion into peoples’ lives, seeking to not only understand but also feel and experience the world as they do. Ethnography, emerging from the discipline of anthropology, provides a systematic research method for digging into people's core values and beliefs, feelings and attitudes, needs and aspirations, while uncovering the hidden meanings of their social life. This knowledge allows designers to be responsive to the emerging needs of their clientele and able to generate
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. Appreciate the key role of ethnography in user-centric, participatory and empathic design particularly, and in design research more generally. 2. Develop a detailed understanding of the setting, its people, and their issues, and create a design concept (proposition) to address those issues. 3. Practice different observational method in ethnographic fieldwork (person-oriented, setting-oriented, object-oriented, activity-oriented) 4. Learn and practice different ethnographic data collection techniques including the use of ‘informants’, and contextual interviewing. 5. Gain knowledge of data analysis techniques, focusing on the problem of remaining faithful to the natural organization of the social world. Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will be able to - 1. Develop the ability to select an appropriate research topic that engages with a selected theme from lecture and identify potential research strategies including a review of relevant literature.
Arch 2161 Vernacular Architecture Around the World 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course is reflected in the types of dwellings and other structures built during a particular period of time, by certain cultural ethnic groups, or in a certain geographic region of the world which are not designed by professional architects. The course will look at the study of vernacular architecture traditions all around the world; transmission of indigenous, traditional and vernacular skills, expertise and knowledge; conservation, regeneration and sustainability of the vernacular building heritage worldwide; historic towns, tourism and heritage management; thermal comfort in vernacular architecture. A vernacular approach is taken to examine the entire built environment—the cultural landscape, in which so-called high style and more common place buildings coexist and are part of a historical and spatial continuum.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To introduce the skills of identifying and analyzing geographic patterns of world folk architecture. 2. To examine all aspects of the history, characteristics, and meaning of vernacular architecture. 3. To explore the origins and development of typological research in vernacular architecture. 4. To examine recent critiques of the established vernacular classification systems with research methods associated with them and explore some alternative approaches to understanding vernacular building patterns. Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will able to - 1. Evaluate that how people who are not trained as architect; design and build. 2. Address the sociocultural, political and economic issues to perceive build form and landscapes mean to their builders and users. 3. Adopt the skills of visual literacy: how to think critically, to analyze creatively, and to write clearly about the vernacular built environment. 4. Distinguish between building types and s
Arch 2166 Climatology Lab 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The laboratory will include experiments, workbook exercises, and analysis of real-time computer weather graphics. There will be seminars in climatology and climate change. The course involves hands-on, practical experience with instrumentation and associated software to measure temperature, precipitation, humidity, wind speed, radiation, etc. Course Objectives: 1. Lab exercises are designed to help students appreciate the practical application of theoretical concepts. 2. Students will work with microclimatic data and instrumentation including anemometers, temperature and relative humidity sensors, and. 3. Transfer climatic raw data into easily usable format for architectural design.
Section B: Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to— 1. Choose appropriate climatic equipment’s and use them to assess any climatic condition. 2. Format computerized data loggers to record desired kind of climatic data. 3. Download and record climatic data in standard format. 4. Analyze climatic raw data for any region and develop architectural design guide lines.
CE 2151 Principles of Construction 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course introduces the basic constructional principles and an understanding of integrating the aesthetic aspects and technical requirements in a design project. This course contains the construction and installation process of substructure and superstructure of a building, sustainability of construction, etc. This course content includes constructionof structural frame (steel and concrete); in-situ and precast concrete; walls, insulation concepts and opening; roofs, floors and foundations; Stair, lifts and ramps; internal wall finishes; cladding systems; moisture and condensation; soil investigation techniques; pavement construction. Students will be encouraged to investigate the choice of alternative constructional systems relevant to their architectural design. The course comprises of 3 hrs theory lectures per week including site visits.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To familiarize the student with basic principles of all forms of building construction. 2. To explore application of these principles 3. To provide the means by which to address these principles both in studio work and throughout a lifetime in architectural practice Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students are expected to 1. Detect the need to critically review precedents from a constructional point of view 2. Demonstrate the basic construction methods of structural components of a building 3. Identify the common errors in construction of a building and investigate the remedial measures 4. Analyze and identify the construction process going on around them 5. Rate and adapt from alternative constructional strategies relevant to design.
Arch 2212 Built Environmental Design 6 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Relatively complex problems (projects) are dealt with while engaging students to study those while remain focused on climate and energy. Varied techniques used in vernacular architecture to cope with the harsh climatic challenges as well as to achieve the most comfortable living environment are also studied. Further investigations cultivate a critical attitude among the students to compare local climatic solutions with global examples. Climate is held as one of the predominant factors behind the shaping of built-environment and spatial culture in the broader sense. Detailed instigations on typology of the buildings are taken to understand critically how climate outlines the key framework for ‘building’ culture – and prepare critique on the appropriation of ‘imported’ modern techniques/technologies in local and regional context.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. Focus and learn about grasping architectural ideas from wherever sources they are found. 2. Provide insight on how socio-cultural intensions in the production of architecture (ideas and building) and articulate these in their own architectural proposition respecting social, cultural, behavioural, anthropometric and climatic aspects. 3. Develop critical positions in the students on the question of ‘building’, where ‘building’ implying not a mere edifice, but the act of making different architectural elements (walls, columns and pavements). 4. Engage students to develop critical positions on to the extent where building is necessary, when to build and whether to build at all in a given design problem. 5. Create elaborate opportunities for the students to interact with users. 6. Guide students to study and re-design various contested built environment examples from Khulna and similar cities. 7. Address issues and questions involving enclosure, privacy, boundary, zoning (c
Arch 2224 Technical Communication 3 Credit
Course content: Comprehensive Studio to produce construction documents for a thorough buildings design. Course Objectives: 1. To familiarize students with the all essential components of construction documents 2. Student will be introduced with the various tools and techniques to produce construction documents Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course students will have learned to: 1. integrate digital tools in design process 2. draw so that they can illustrate, focus and clarify design intentions 3. Purposefully and efficiently evaluate a design, build a model and render images or drawings that are both clarifying and evocative. 4. Produce construction documents
Arch 2231 Modernism and Architecture of City 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: A critical analysis of modern architecture & urbanism taking into account its polemical inception in the early twentieth century, its re-evaluation & diffusion after the Second World War, & its relevance for contemporary architecture. Course Objectives: 1. To provide foundational knowledge concerning modern movements in global architecture and urbanism, from the early-20th century to the present. 2. To explore the relationships between developments in architectural practice and broader dynamics of 20th century history. 3. The course uses architectural exemplars to explore the social, political, technological, economic, and aesthetic guises of modernity.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Develop analytical skills in formal and conceptual approaches to architectural modernity 2. Provide a critical overview of the architectural profession and its historical context over the last century 3. Impart knowledge of the major periods and developments of modern movements in architecture and their relationship to the multiple guises of modernity in which they were embedded. 4. Acquire the architectural literacy required to perceive the contemporary built environment as an artifact of modernity's varied legacies.
Arch 2233 Built Environmental Design Theory 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Identify implication of architectural lighting and its relationship with spatial quality. Understanding human perception of luminous environment. Developing design criteria and designing for natural and artificial lighting in architectural spaces. Understand how knowledge of architectural acoustics serves as environmental quality modifier. Learning physiology of sound; generation, propagation and perception of sound. Study of auditorium acoustics; behaviour of sound in indoor spaces. Techniques of noise measurements and various methods of its control in indoor spaces. Course Objectives: 1. Understanding properties and application of light and sound as modifiers of architectural spaces. 2. Students will be competent to identify significance of lighting and acoustical design in architectural spaces to improve workability or efficiency. 3. Make a clear conception about lighting and acoustical design criteria in different context. 4. Familiarize the students with the tools and techniques o
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to -- 1. Measure light and sound in terms of both quality and quantity. 2. Recognize the factors of acoustics and lighting that act as modifier of architectural spaces. 3. Identify special features of light and sound that are to be considered with special care during built environment design. 4. Evaluate performance of a built environment from the acoustics and lighting point of view. 5. Apply this knowledge into his/her studio projects with innovative approach.
Arch 2262 Climatic Design, Modeling and Simulation 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The course will address the major steps in the development of visual models, and how they are used for decision-making, with a particular emphasis on climatic variables. The course is focused on analyzing, modelling and finally understanding and solving complex systems under multiple constraints. Several methods will be assessed for visualizing simulated and measured indoor climate and energy performance of buildings. Learning objectives: 1. To give a good understanding of parameters influencing the indoor climate and energy performance of buildings. 2. To simulating the indoor climate and energy performance of buildings in the context of designing high-performance buildings (passive, near-zero-energy and positive energy buildings). 3. To analyse the function and the energy efficiency of climate control technologies of buildings in a system perspective. 4. To understand the advantages and weaknesses at different simulation tools.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will able to – 1.Demonstrate the system studies of the thermal properties of buildings, air movements in buildings as well as climate control technologies. 2. Apply simulation techniques to solve complex system issues and to select feasible, if not optimum, solutions and configurations amongst competing designs. 3. Integrate decision analysis methods to make sound decisions under risk and uncertainty. 4. Identify the possibilities and constraints in simulating the indoor climate and energy performance of buildings. 5. Select an appropriate analytical technique for modeling and ultimately solving this problem.
Arch 2266 Material, Processes and Constructions 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: While space is the most distinguished objective of architecture, the boundaries and character of space are defined by elements of non-space: materials, processes, and constructions. This is the paradox of architecture. This course explores a conceptual framework for the environmentally responsive design of building assemblies, based upon a clear understanding of materials and their inherent processes and construction technologies. Building materials will be analyzed and carefully drawn with emphasis on their physical and architectural properties, functions, and behavior in manufactured and installed constructions. The design of building assemblies made from concrete, masonry, timber, steel, and glass will be examined in relation to the forces that shape their composition and performance.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To explores conceptual framework for the environmentally responsive design of building assemblies, based upon a clear understanding of materials and their inherent processes and construction technologies 2. To describe the properties, functions and behavior of building materials including construction technologies 3. To analyze the forces that shape the composition and performance of different building materials Intended Learning Outcomes: The students can expect to 1.Describe the physical properties and environmental impact of building materials 2.Demonstrate experimentation with conventional construction materials in a design exercise. 3.Investigate and judge how material choice and detail design can feedback into the overall design of a building.
CE 2251 Integrated Building System 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The course contains the methods of integration and procedures for analyzing building systems in relation to specific environmental considerations, architectural design, construction and building life-cycle operations. Emphasis is placed on understanding how successful integration brings all building elements together in a sympathetic way. Exemplary case studies will be used to link what is learned in the design studio. The topics include water supply and sanitation system in building, drainage and sewage disposal, introduction to water supply and drainage system in high-rise building, introduction to electrification in building, electrical equipment and electrical installations for building, problems and precautions of building electrification, Introduction to mechanical equipment for heating, cooling, ventilation and vertical transportation in a building, working principle of mechanical equipment and supporting structural component, requirement of special mechanical equipment and system for
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To explain the existing building technology such as mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire services, etc. and how the technological advancement has been changing the design and construction industry, the environment and users ‘experience 2. To inspire and encourage students to develop a vision of the future technology, its integration and application to architecture, and its interaction with users and environment Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students are expected to 1. Outline the problems and relate with the precaution needed for electrification in a building 2. Summarize the working principle of mechanical equipment and point out their supporting structural components 3. Assess the performance of water supply and sanitation system in building 4. Determine drainage and sewage disposal system 5. Appraise the fire escape and fire protection system in a building 6. Interpret building regulations and safety legislation 7. Demonstrate critic
Arch 3112 Contemporary Architectural Design 0.75 Credit
Section A: Course Content: First term remains interested in the detail analysis of building systems. The term focuses on three key components of the building system: structure, plumbing and fire-fighting. Various structural systems are studied and used in the design projects to introduce the students with the complexity of making and giving a functional outcome. Three structural systems are explored based on varying span supporting capacity. Course Objectives: 1. Develop relevant professional knowledge (building codes and laws, green building principles, ethics of professional practice etc.) among the students. 2. Acquaint students with various aspects of building systems, and explore those in close engagement with relevant professionals, involving site visit and first-hand experience of making small and large scale structural models. 3. Direct students to a more coherent understanding of complex layers of building systems ranging from structure, electro-mechanical and plumbing issues to philosophical groundi
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will have - 1. Acquire sound and comprehensive understanding of building systems (structure, electro-mechanical system and fire fighting). 2. Distinguish/compare between different structural systems including brick, concrete and steel. 3. Analyze comparative benefits between different span types: short and compression dominated structural system to tension dominated structural systems. 4. Accomplish effective negotiating/leadership capacity as a result of a high level competence in key areas in a multi-expert team.
Arch 3124 Architecture Field Survey 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The class will learn the methods and process for conducting field surveys for architects. Resource identification, terminology, description, photography, sketching, research and evaluation are integral components of the learning experience. Class discussions will focus on all aspects of the survey and evaluation process and the use of survey results by various entities. Class participants will receive training through lectures, required readings, discussions, research and fieldwork. Course Objectives: 1. To introduce the fundamental methods and process of field survey which an architect needs to conduct for a design or research project 2. To enable the students to identify and record prominent architectural styles 3. To familiarize the students with appropriate vocabulary for elements of sites and the buildings 4. To draw an accurate site plan from aria maps and site measurements
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will be able to 1. Identify the methods of field survey 2. Record and identify architectural styles 3. Choose vocabulary for elements of sites and the buildings 4. Demonstrate the ability to draw accurate site plan when necessary to produce for a design or research project.
Arch 3131 Topics in Contemporary Architecture 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Examines contemporary architectural theory and practice from the late 1960s to the present. A number of issues and values will be explored through theoretical essays, critical writings and lecture presentations that expose the diversity of contemporary architectural thought and practices. Considers the changing role of theory with respect to practice over the past fifty years, and aims to furnish students with a set of questions, techniques, and tools for criticism and self- critique. Course Objectives: 1. To investigate on some of the pivotal events that has shaped our understanding and approach to architecture. 2. To explore canonical architects, buildings and movements that has exerted significant influences on the development of architecture. 3. To explore opposing positions and values that coexists within various time frames in both local and global contexts.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Analyze the built fabric of cities that composed of buildings and spaces produced over a long period of time. 2. Differentiate contemporary thoughts and architectures from architecture of the past. 3. Communicate more effectively about design that can also aid in developing own design ideas in studio. 4. Interpret motivation and societal forces behind the design, and the process of creating new relevant forms. 5. Apply critical thinking to theories in the history of architecture.
Arch 3141 Sustainability and the Built Environment 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course embrace the co-evolution of technological, environmental and social change over time with covers key elements of building services and sustainability at a residential and commercial scale and examines the broad range of issues confronting mankind’s search for a sustainable. The subject aims to teach the basic terminology and concepts behind providing comfortable and effectively functioning building in terms of population and urbanization; transportation and logistics; technology and mobility; water; waste; energy; food; (natural) disasters; and community and governance. Through the perspective of contemporary and historical case studies students explore how people, in their visions of the future, have sought to perfect built environments as the setting for model communities. This subject also provides an introduction to how people identify needs and wants and devise ways of satisfying them through built or engineered manipulation of the environment. Students will consider the a
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. Design processes and methods, including problem-solving and design proposal perspectives, methods of framing and analysis of design tasks, creative thinking, and methods of synthesis and representation of design outcomes. 2. Introduce and practice processes and methods of designing and creative thinking and look to define their own vision of a sustainable community; 3. Introduce the actors in design processes, including the contribution of design professions to the creation of designed environments, systems and artefacts. Intended Learning Outcomes: On completion of this subject students will be able to: 1. Communicate the terminology, principles and techniques of environmental control systems at both small and medium scale; 2. Integrate environmental controls into architectural designs in a sustainable manner. 3. Analyze the social, logistical, economic and resource aspects that contribute to design tasks and outcomes; 4. This course is intended to inspire thinking about the
Arch 3143 Building Code, Health and Wellbeing 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Importance of building code for a healthy society. Factors related to health and wellbeing that could be operated through building code. Effects of indoor environments on occupant well-being and functioning, Assessing amount and quality of light and color, the sense of enclosure, the sense of privacy, access to window views, connection to nature, sensory variety, and personal control over environmental conditions. Study of positive impacts on work effectiveness and other high value outcomes, such as stress reduction, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Assessment of impacts due to concentrations of municipal and industrial wastes associated with increasing urbanization. Chronological history of building code development in Bangladesh. Organization engaged in developing building code in Bangladesh and their co-relation with different sectors of health and wellbeing. International standards of building code that are operating successfully to preserve health and safety of the co
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. Understand the importance of building code in developing individual and public health and wellbeing. 2. Identify the factors of building code that are instrumental in ensuring people’s health and wellbeing in a settlement. 3. Investigate into the chronological performance of building code in shaping public health and wellbeing in Bangladesh. Intended Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to— 1. Assess the existing building code of a city and its performance in preserving health and wellbeing. 2. Relate each of the items of building code with its projected outcome in terms of health and wellbeing in the context of a city. 3. Identify areas to upgrade or improve within existing building codes in a changed situation. 4. Carry out research to develop effective set of building code for any city development.
Arch 3151 Building Services Technology 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Introduction to technicalities of electro-mechanical and plumbing systems in buildings. Study of electrical equipments and electrical installations for buildings. Calculations to assess electricity requirements in simple buildings. Mechanical equipments for heating, cooling, ventilation, vertical transportation in buildings. Calculations to assess the mechanical needs of a simple building. Basic understanding on electro-mechanical requirements and related problems and precautions for multi-storied buildings. Understanding water supply and sanitation system in buildings. Study of drainage and sewage disposal systems and fire safety in high-rise building. Preliminary study of rain water harvesting and ground water recharging. Course Objectives: 1. Equip students with basic technicalities of electro-mechanical and plumbing system of a building. 2. Understand the importance and means of optimization of electro-mechanical, fire safety and plumbing service systems in buildings. 3. Acquire
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to— 1. Make rooms to accommodate appropriate electro-mechanical equipments into architectural design. 2. Calculate electro-mechanical and plumbing requirements in simple buildings. 3. Calculate needs and capacity and recommend necessary vertical transportation system for simple high-rise building. 4. Choose sizes, shapes and slopes for surface water and waste water drainage. 5. Incorporate rain water harvesting and ground water recharging system into architectural design.
CE 3156 Basic Structural Design Lab 1.5 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course gives students the opportunity to explore widely in the world of structural design and analysis. They will learn structural analysis from both graphical and numerical standpoint, and through the case studies of built examples. Topics covered in this course include static equilibrium, tension and compression, axial stresses, buckling, bending moment and bending stresses. Teaching will be given not only through lectures but also through classroom sessions and in conjunction with the design studio which includes a structural investigation of a studio design project. Preliminary design of short spanned and compression dominated structures will be incorporated in this course which can be conducted by hands-on calculation and/or using computer aided tools.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To familiarize the students with the fundamentals of statics, a sense of how structures resist forces and be able to visualize the load path and direction of forces 2. To explain how the principles of statics and strength of materials are applied to the elements of structural components 3. To develop awareness and understanding of the fundamental principles of structural design sufficient to implement strategies in design projects Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will be able to 1. identify the behavior and characteristics of structural components and systems with reference to structural design principles 2. Analyze and detect the role of structure in the architectural design of buildings with reference to particular case study buildings 3. Explain the principles of structural design 4. Detect the consequences of bad design 5. Synthesize the knowledge of structural principles and construction techniques in a design exercise.
CE 3166 Building Construction Materials and Product Design Lab 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on architectural drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving. Principles and analytic vocabulary are introduced through lectures, weekly reading, discussions, and exercise. Project-based work will challenge students to work individually, as well as collaboratively with external parties. Course Objectives: 1. This course surveys processes commonly used by industrial designers at various scales of production and provides advanced methodologies for developing and constructing more sustainable and long-lasting products. 2. Students apply
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Develop design skills through the interaction with industrial materials that have strictly defined properties. and evaluate how this information is both connected to and influenced by the design process 2. Experiment with these materials Students will work directly and master skills needed to manipulate these materials and formed promotes innovative thinking, problem solving and idea development. 3. Apply more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening their technical skill base. 4. Develop projects that allow them to engage in the design and development process, promote creativity, problem solving, and the correct use of materials. 5. Choose appropriate facility procedures, safety and care facilities and use of tools and equipment for building construction.
Arch 3212 Ecological Architectural Design 9 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Second term studies the philosophical point of view in the making of architecture. Students research on works of Masters and contemporary architectural projects (with a focus on green building principles). Detailed investigations enable students to effectively grasp the related challenges, positionalities and interventions in studied projects as well as to develop their own philosophical positions and relevant design parameters. Course Objectives: 1. Develop relevant professional knowledge (building codes and laws, green building principles, ethics of professional practice etc.) among the students. 2. Acquaint students with various aspects of building systems, and explore those in close engagement with relevant professionals, involving site visit and first-hand experience of making small and large scale structural models. 3. Direct students to a more coherent understanding of complex layers of building systems ranging from structure, electro-mechanical and plumbing issues to philosop
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: 1. Formulate concepts integrating philosophy and principles (especially of Green Building), technical knowhow of building systems and the aspirations of the user. 2. Assume a critical approach to architectural design, developing original insights and framing key lessons in the process. 3. Develop maturity in argument and growing philosophical awareness in architectural intervention. 4. Synthesize philosophy/principles and technology into a single whole.
Arch 3231 Interior Architecture and Design 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course has a reputation and creative vision which puts it at the forefront of professional interior design practice. The Interior Designer deals with the spaces inside buildings. The role of the Interior Designer is to create interiors with spatial qualities that are habitable for people on all levels of experience: aesthetically, functionally, psychologically and economically. The aim is to achieve comfort and efficiency; spaces that answer the needs of the client. Therefore the Interior Designer is concerned with the layout, finishes, details, furnishings and lighting of such spaces in new buildings or as part of refurbishment projects. An Interior Designer is much more that a decorator. He or she is a key contributor to the professional team and works in collaboration with architects, quantity surveyors, engineers, project managers, building contractors and suppliers of products, from the design stage - when ideas are considered and designs developed – to the final completion of the
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To produce confident, enterprising, adaptable, cooperative and highly creative interior architects and professional design practice responsive to the needs of contemporary society. 2. To develop students’ capacity for innovatory thought, technical understanding and communication, based on a critical and reflective understanding of the discipline. 3. To develop the ‘thinking designer’ as an individual creative personality who can respond to design constraints and opportunities holistically. 4. To develop enterprising, effective, self-reliant and self-directed people capable of life-long learning, concepts which are rooted in the tradition of art and design education. 5. To create graduates who will create meaningful and enduring interior spaces this can positively and inclusively enhance human experience. Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to 1. Apply appropriate theories, methodology and tools to identify, critically evaluate and
Arch 3241 Energy Efficient Design 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course focuses on residential energy conservation and considers it as a primary energy resource. Energy conservation is the most cost-effective, environmentally safe method for lowering energy costs and reducing dependence on a finite supply of fossil fuel. Conservation means being smarter and using better, more efficient technology. Students will explore alternative sources of energy, but primary discussion in Energy Efficient Design involves technical issues, dealing with building methods and materials used to save energy while at the same time, improving comfort and performance. Political, economic and environmental issues are inextricably connected to energy conservation and these will enter into classroom dialogue. Classroom lectures focus on the fundamentals of residential energy-use involving: energy-saving materials and products; energy-efficient technology and design; sustainable construction; alternative energy sources; affordable housing, political impact and regulatory devel
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To focus on energy efficiency as an important design determinant 2. To enable the students to design buildings for low energy use and optimal indoor air quality including ventilation, energy efficiency, moisture problems, and prevention Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will be able to 1. Explain the introductory approach of thermodynamics and heat transfer mechanism 2. Detect the leading order factors in building energy use 3. Employ their understanding of energy fundamentals and knowledge of building energy use in innovative building design projects.
Arch 3261 Real Estate Development 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Provides an overview of the real estate development process with an emphasis on analysis, risk management, and decision-making relative to changing economic, environmental, institutional, regulatory, and social contexts. Course Objectives: 1. To examine the forces that shape real estate development. 2. To explore the market analysis methods and techniques to evaluate project feasibility. 3. To examine the institutional and legal framework within which real estate development occurs and that influences controls.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Identify key issues, make reasoned arguments where there may be no clear answer, and understand the economic implications of legal rules. 2. Understand the key concepts and data sources that are needed to conduct commercial real estate analysis, including issues of policy and financial feasibility. 3. Develop skills in using legal concepts in a real estate transactional setting. 4. Develop capacity for critical thinking and ability to present sound, well-justified arguments and solutions to complex problems. 5. Recognize the interconnected nature of real estate practice.
Arch 3262 Architecture by Nature 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Architecture by nature evolves autonomously from its users and engages with the dynamic complicity between built projects and processes in nature. It is less concerned with environmental compliance and more with the productive collision between architecture and nature: landward, seaward and skyward. We will study intentions from ideal and elementary architectural precedents throughout history. These case studies are grafted in and wrought by extreme environments and will offer a platform from which students will develop their own project. Time based procedures will be introduced as a mean to register physical transformations in the natural environment. We will seek to create specific architectural prototypes that without dependence on nature would simply become generic; instruments taking on the active and physical role of measuring spatially the changing nature of environmental force, otherwise intangible.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To study ideal and elementary architectural precedents throughout history and explain the physical transformation in the natural environment. 2. To create architectural prototypes that is evolved from its users and engaged with the dynamic complicity between built projects and processes in nature. 3. To offer a platform with the help of case studies and time based procedures to the students with which they will develop their own projects. Intended Learning Outcomes: After completion of this course the students are expected to 1. Enhance their ability to design architectural projects adaptively and in complicity with physical and spatial environments 2. Create architectural prototypes engaging the dynamic complicity between built projects and processes in nature.
CE 3256 Advanced Structural Design Lab 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course covers the analysis and design of highly complex structures. Similar to previous term, the students will learn from both graphical and numerical standpoint, and through the case studies of built examples. The content consists of analysis of long spanned, tension dominated and composite structures used in, but not limited to, tall multistoried buildings. The course will be conducted by hands-on calculation and using computer aided design tools. For composite structure, a systematic approach is adopted to integrate all the previous knowledge of structural design. Teaching will be given through classroom sessions and in conjunction with the design studio. Course Objectives: 1. To further develop an understanding of design of state of the art structures in architecture 2. To explain how the knowledge of aesthetic, environmental, structural, spatial and material strategies are incorporated in architectural design
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will be able to 1. Explain of the principles of complex structure design 2. Investigate and appraise the building user’s requirement, appropriate performance standards and safety requirements in relation to structural design 3. Describe and choose cutting edge technologies 4. Synthesize the knowledge of structural principles and construction techniques in a design exercise.
URP 3243 City Planning in a Global Perspective 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Study of cities around the world to provide an understanding of both historical and contemporary dimensions of how cities form and develop- and how human interventions shape these complex processes. Study cities from a range of countries including Global South and Global North in lectures and course readings. Course Objectives: 1. To examine the global perspective on the processes of urbanization 2. To explore the social, historical, political, cultural and economic forces that shape the cities in the context of globalization. 3. To analyze the processes of globalization and how they influence and account for urban formation. 4. To explore the contemporary planning practice.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Identify how cities and regions work, and how actions and interventions constitute what we observe as urban development and change. 2. Develop an understanding of the historical rationale for urban planning, with a focus on the evolving rationale for planning in Bangladesh. 3. Identify contemporary planning practice and current issues faced by planners. 4. Analyze urban planning issues and phenomena in our local context.
Arch 4112 Habitat Design – Urban Studio 9 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Urban Studio explores individual design interest working in a team of thematic research cluster, lab, or center that deals with real-life socio-economic, cultural and environmental issues common in the urban context of Bangladesh or similar other countries. Urban Studio of Habitat Design focuses on the agendas and approaches to the making and reading of urban conditions and designs particularly in the context of cities in the developing nations. The analysis of most significant works and texts, with emphasis on architecture as the vehicle of study, and keeping a constant reference to urban and landscape theories and designs, focus is given on the design and development of complex architectural projects situated in urban contexts and developed with regard to program, site, building, and representation. Students need to develop their skills in two-way design communication and critical thinking. Students are introduced to urban design, who conduct broad-based research into issues regarding large
Section B: Course Objectives: The course intends to: 1. Develop awareness on and acknowledgement of the complexities, contradictions, dualities and vulnerabilities underlying the man-made spatio-physical environment. 2. Recognize the intensions and actions of agents as a key force in the (trans)formation of built environment (in relation to the making of place). 3. Inform students about the importance of assuming a theoretically informed position; being critical about the concepts of ‘modernity and sustainability' and update themselves about key spatial theories which include but are not limited to the literatures of (Post)Modernism, (Post)Colonialism, (Post)Marxism and Neoliberalism. 4. Maintain a clear methodology and the content and focus being rigorous and discursive, and open along different academic streams for further inquiry and exploration. In that, additional to the conventional architectural tools and techniques, those used in Urban Design, Urban Planning, Housing Studies, Environment Behaviour Stud
Arch 4124 Design Research Methodology 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The course will help students to anticipate, identify, and resolve the challenges involved in designing and conducting research projects in the built environment. Designs become more meaningful and effective for they would be grounded in real-world contexts. Students will learn the principles to carry out smaller research projects by gaining greater skills both in the formulation of coherently structured arguments. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the process of design research and to help designers understand how critical it is to being able to develop good designs. These goals will be achieved by introducing students to various sources of information and to acquaint them with different methodological instruments for identifying underlying research motivations and assumptions. It will also introduce research tools, planning considerations, and frameworks for presenting results. The course methodology involves critical analysis, investigation and production of scientific
Section B: Course Objectives: The aim of this course is to provide the necessary tools for students to conduct research within design and planning, and to produce their research findings in writing. The course involves the key research processes including conceptualization, information searching, evaluation, analysis, report-writing and presentation technique. It addresses underpinnings of research design, among them the issues of validity, reliability and ethics. It aims to: 1. Develop the student's understanding of the role of research in architecture and research design as a part of the designerly thinking. 2. Enhance the student's abilities to interpret and evaluate research. 3. Improve the student's abilities to conduct and present architecture research. 4. Increase the student's understanding of data, information, and knowledge. Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will be able to - 1. Critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of various research studies and techniques. 2.
Arch 4141 Urban Design Theories and Criticism 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Critical investigation into the relationship between urban space, people and society. Basic concepts and theories of urban design will be interpreted in relation to the chronological development of towns, squares or plazas, streets and buildings. Focus will be on historical, socio-cultural and milestone examples, which affects economic forces that are the definitive architectural shape of the urban fabric and the plans for the city. Application of principles, techniques, regulatory and institutional frameworks into sustainability urban design. Contemporary issues and approaches in urban design like urban infill, renewal, redevelopment, conservation, water urbanism and development control. Course Objectives: 1. This course primarily introduces thinking about how cities grow and change. 2. Develop capacity to build and maintain resilient urban design and built environment which are humane and environment friendly, invulnerable against disaster, and well-coordinated with local culture and
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to-- 1. Develop a broad vision of urban design and its relationship with built environment and planning. 2. Relate people and place with the development process of a city at large. 3. Develop architectural and urban design solution addressing contemporary urban issues. 4. Become responsible leaders, who can remain active internationally in the field of urban design and built environment. 5. Carry out higher studies and research in the field of urban design.
Arch 4143 Architectural Conservation 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Historic built environment of Bangladesh is rich and diverse. It provides an important sense of national identity, contributing to our quality of life and benefitting the country's economy and education. This course covers the history and philosophy of historic environment conservation, and provides a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. This course provides knowledge about the repair, maintenance and improvement of these historic buildings including the current issues of urban regeneration and enabling development. Course Objectives: 1. To understand the development of the philosophy and ethics of conservation and the legislation and policy that protect the historic environment 2. To give a critical understanding of the technical and regulatory bases of building conservation and their application to specific problem. 3. To be knowledgeable about the understanding of contemporary issues related to building conservation. 4. To learn
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will able to - 1. Demonstrate their familiarity with the historical and theoretical foundations and challenges of historic preservation; 2. Discover the key concepts and approaches involved in conserving the built heritage, and the ethics and philosophies that underlie them. 3. Develop their research, analytical and presentation skills for conservation challenges of historic buildings of different time period.
Arch 4145 Landscape Urbanism 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Introducing the student in the new concept of landscaped urbanism and creating an awareness of its potential as a design strategy in planning urban territories and dealing with the problem of urbanization in general. The course will develop the theoretical base of landscape urbanism and highlights the field’s potential resistive power to globalization. It will critically review the hypotheses as put forth by various theorists/practitioners. It will also explore early ancient traditions of landscape urbanism long before it was named as such. Thereafter the course will develop a series of biases embedded within the discourse and realized projects. Course objectives: 1. To investigate and evaluate of the various theories and approaches at hand. It Includes the discussion related to the basic uncertainty of planning and the potential answer offered by this new disciplinary approach within that inherent condition of contemporary urbanization. 2. To give a synthetic overview of the criteria
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will able to – 1. Evaluate the methods in which landscape can be used as a strategy for creating coherence in today’s urbanization processes. 2. Share a common interest in overlaying ecological (natural and social) and urban strategies, allowing for projects to address their relationship to their respective cities and regions at multiple scales. 3. Interpret theoretical knowledge and its practical implementation in large scale projects.
Arch 4147 Public Interest Architecture 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Assess the relationship between public service and the built environment to projects that address real community needs and explore how each of these terms affects design. Course Objectives: 1. To directly respond to the needs of underserved communities. 2. To raise the question of equity within the design professions 3. To create sustainable communities that are healthy, prosperous and equitable places where people can live, work, and socialize.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Employs the tools of community-based design as a platform for addressing social and physical specifics of place 2. Contribute to the larger national discussion about the experience the public brings to architecture and planning discourse and practice. 3. Operates in dialogue with communities within Austin, Texas, as well as with other similar emerging programs. 4. Develop theoretical and practical skills to respond to the ethical complications of engaging the public and its spaces.
Arch 4162 Topics in Advanced Structures 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course gives students the opportunity to further explore specific issues and topics in advanced structural systems for architecture. The course will present precedent projects, case studies and strategies for integrating structural principles into the design process. Course topics may include, but are not limited to the study of established and exploratory structural systems, construction materials, and fabrication techniques. Course Objectives: 3. To explore specific issues and topics in advanced structural systems for architecture through case studies 4. To explain how the knowledge of structural systems, construction materials and fabrication techniques are incorporated in architectural design
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students are expected to 5. Explain the principles of advanced structure design 6. Describe and choose cutting edge technologies 7. Synthesize the knowledge of structural principles and construction techniques for architectural design
ES 4161 Urban Ecology 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Ecology is being transformed from a field historically disengaged from the human built environment to one that can provide insight into the understanding, design, and management of the constructed world. Urban ecology is central in this transformation. This course provides an ecological perspective to the environmental challenges and opportunities related to urban development adopting an inter–disciplinary approach. The course will include fieldwork augmented with an overview of current literature in urban ecology, focusing on issues relating to science, application, advocacy and contemporary concepts of stewardship. Course objectives: 1. To introduce the concepts and theories of ecology in urban context. 2. To examine the current understanding of urban ecosystems and that question the relationship between people, society and environment. 3. To explain the principles and strategies for bio-diversity conservation and management for sustainable urban development and the associated co
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will able to - 1. Explain urban areas affect local, regional, and global biodiversity patterns. 2. Develop knowledge about how urban ecosystems function, the response of plants and animal to urban environments and human work as a component of this system. 3. Compile scientifically informed decisions about societal issues related to urban areas. 4. Design communicate solutions with its immediate built environment.
Arch 4212 Habitat Design – Rural Studio 9 Credit
Section A: Course Content: In a context of a rapidly transforming ruralscapes and non-urban areas, and within a general ignorance of the discipline of Architecture to rural geography, this lab demonstrates a way to bring design, in all its dimensions (from aesthetics to community-based design/planning process), to address the present and prospective issues pertaining to rural architecture particularly and built environment generally. While the reasons behind these transformations remain manifold – social, economic, political, demographic, occupational, environmental and above all infrastructural with their profound impact on rural quality of life, critical addressing of these provide fresh opportunities to devise new ways of thinking for the discipline of Architecture. The problem-solving processes of rural design hence take into account of the community values, recognize their assets and eco-environmental qualities, and question how these could enhance the rural communities’ quality of life. The design process en
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. Awareness on and acknowledgement of the complexities, contradictions, dualities and vulnerabilities underlying the man-made spatio-physical environment. 2. Recognize the intensions and actions of agents as a key force in the (trans)formation of built environment (in relation to the making of place). 3. Inform students about the importance of assuming a theoretically informed position; being critical about the concepts of ‘modernity and sustainability' and update themselves about key spatial theories which include but are not limited to the literatures of (Post)Modernism, (Post)Colonialism, (Post)Marxism and Neoliberalism. 4. Maintain a clear methodology and the content and focus being rigorous and discursive, and open along different academic streams for further inquiry and exploration. In that, additional to the conventional architectural tools and techniques, those used in Urban Design, Urban Planning, Housing Studies, Environment Behavior Studies, Sociology, Anthropology and
Arch 4241 Housing and Development 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Access to housing and housing informality in developing countries, financial crises arising out of the housing sector, and potential market-oriented and public policy solutions. Explores the operation of housing market, the nature of the housing and community development problem, and the gradual development of a national housing and community development policy since the 1930s. Course Objectives: 1. To examine the housing provision system in Global South and Global North. 2. To explore the housing informality in Global South and its provisional mechanism. 3. To examine the role of different stakeholders in housing provision.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Identify key issues of housing problems in Global South. Discuss the different housing policy and financial mechanism of Global South and Global North. 2. Develop capacity for critical thinking and ability to present pro poor housing strategies for Bangladesh. 3. Recognize housing as a process rather a product.
Arch 4243 Rural Architecture and Planning 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Rural life and its indigenous way of living of rural people play an important role to learn our own identity and culture. Its main concern is with managing acceptable and sustainable environmental change in a constantly changing world, and being at the forefront of shaping that world for future generations. With this aim this course is discussed the characteristics of rural landscape in Bangladesh, its origin, typology according to its topography, understanding about the quality of life. Course Objectives: 1. To identify the problems and issues in rural development: population, urbanization and migration, human resource development. 2. To understand the nature and scope of integrated rural development -social, economic and physical characteristics of rural settlements. 3. To discuss the practiced planning policies, rules-regulations and strategies for future development.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will able to – 1. Evaluate the several typologies of rural settlement and their different formation process. 2. Integrate the local construction technology, traditional materials and methods in design process. 3. Execute indigenous adaptive measures respecting nature. 4. Explain the earth construction methods and materials of vernacular architecture.
Arch 4263 Sustainable Design Methods 2 Credit
Course Content: This course gives students the opportunity to further explore specific issues and topics in sustainable building technology. The course will present precedent projects and case studies and ask students to undertake projects that deal with strategies for sustainable building design. Course Objectives: 1. To explore issues and topics in sustainable building technology Intended Learning Outcomes: The students can expect to- 1. Generalize the strategies for sustainable building design with detail case studies.
Arch 4266 Community Building Workshop 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The course intends to investigate issues in design and construction through hand-on experiences and involvements in an actual building process. By participating in the design and construction of varies types of community projects including temporary or permanent installations, shelters or buildings, students are to explore the nature of materials and structure, methods in construction, as well as modes of fabrication and design media. The process also provides opportunities for students to interact and exchange knowledge with different stakeholders involving in the building process: users, contractors, managers and sponsors. The focus of task for each year may vary depending on the nature of project and resources available, but a commitment to the community and a team work spirit, as well as the appreciation of the tactile and tectonic quality in design will always be essential part for the course.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To explore different aspects of community projects by participating in design and construction 2. To interact with different stakeholders and identify their role in the building design process 3. To introduce a building/project/resource as a commitment to the community Intended Learning Outcomes: The students are expected to 1. Investigate and accommodate the issues in design and construction of various community projects 2. Interact and exchange knowledge different stakeholders, incorporating their need in community projects 3. Respond to a community project as a commitment to the community 4. Appreciate its physical, geographical and social quality as an essential part of design.
URP 4224 Visual Methods in Planning and Development 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Introduction to Cartography, photo documentation, and geographic information systems as employed in Mapping, planning, policy, management and development. Visual explanations. The courses include both lecture and lab portions; in the lecture portion, students study whether the topography of an area has changed and study how buildings have affected development. For labs, students go to libraries and conduct interviews to visualize how the topography looked previously. Course Objectives: 1. To familiarize the students with the vocabulary and symbols of map design and an overview of types of maps and map-making tool 2. Students will learn how to compile, analyze, and present geospatial data while emphasizing the value of visual communication.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, the student will be able to: 1. Discuss the historical development of the field and practice identifying maps by their historical period. 2. Working with both computer cartography and geographic information systems (GIS), 3. learn the basic principles of geodesy, statistical mapping and graphing, as well as developing basic graphic design skills to create high-quality and accurate maps 4. understand the basics of data capture, storage, analysis, and output in a GIS; and 5. Demonstrate the correct use of topographic maps, compasses and global positioning systems (GPS) to explore a specific area. 6. Interpret the knowledge of GIS in policy making, planning and resource management.
URP 4261 Disaster Resilient Cities 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Bangladesh has known as most hazard prone country due to natural disaster. With growing population and infrastructures, the world’s exposure to hazards is increasing day by day. When disaster strikes, it is vital that any reconstruction activity pro-actively considers how to protect people and their environment, and reduce a community’s vulnerability. Disaster Resilient Architecture will focus on precedent studies on resilient building techniques from all over the world. The course will span from vernacular to contemporary building techniques. The goal is to rediscover traditional building materials and methods and apply them to areas with similar conditions. New techniques can be used as such or adapted to local conditions when possible. Learning Objectives: 1. To familiarizes students with natural hazards policy, planning and management so they can incorporate hazard reduction policies into their professional practice. 2. To evaluate how various hazard reduction measures have pe
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will able to 1. Identify the geologic, climatic and physical factors combine to produce selected natural hazards and their damage functions. 2. Spectrum of hazard reduction measures that can and should be employed for mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. 3.Characterize, analyze and suggest mitigation and recovery planning options for disaster prone area of Bangladesh. 4.Design adaptive settlement and build form for hazardous community especially coastal belts of Bangladesh.
Arch 5112 Thesis-I 9 Credit
Section A: Course Content: In Thesis I, the students prepare a thesis proposal through 1) identifying a needs-based topic and research question; 2) co-constructing a program engaging targeted stakeholders/user-groups/client; and 3) designing the ‘design research’ methodology based on case studies and specific methods of empirical data-gathering and measurable intentions. It is neither possible nor desirable to formulate conclusively the acceptable topics or methods a Thesis might engage, but the following list of possibilities may be taken as useful illustration of proposals that might be pursued: • a project that investigates the body as a metaphor and phenomenological standard for the design of a building. • the theoretical and technical design of an advanced structural or building system including the projection of specific material and constructional processes. • the formulation, through projections of zoning and master planning, of typical architectural developments in an urban, rural, suburban
Section B: Course Objectives: The course intends to: 1. Develop capacity to identify an area of interest within built environment design field through critical review of relevant literature, contextual analysis and case studies. 2. Formulate specific design research question and justify its relevance to the profession. 3. Set objectives, design methodology and formulate a program/basis of design intervention working with the community/stakeholders. Intended Learning Outcomes: After completion of the course students are expected to develop a detailed thesis proposal including potential design ideas/considerations/principles/strategies to pursue built environmental design/support solution in Thesis II.
Arch 5162 Building Information Modeling in Architectural Practice 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: BIM technology is more and more often adopted in architectural practices throughout the world as the main tool for design, managing and documenting projects. Successful implementation of BIM and taking most advantage of the technology requires proper configurations, methodologies and standards. BIM technology allows integration within one project database of Architecture, Structure, MEP (Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing) and others to create a complete virtual model of a future building. Such a model is like a living entity, constantly updated throughout the design process and later during the building lifetime. In various stages of this lifetime a BIM model can be used for many purposes from scheduling and calculating areas, curtain wall costing, outputting documentation, performing thermal analysis to managing tenants and security issues in the field of building maintenance. This course is designed to enhance not only the understanding of capabilities and limitations of the technology i
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To introduce the students to BIM technology including methodology, standards and limitations. 2. To explore the various purpose of use of BIM during the building lifetime. 3. To enhance student's ability to articulate BIM technology in architectural practice. Intended Learning Outcomes: The students are expected to 1. Create a complete virtual model of a building by integrating the database of Architecture, Structure, MEP (Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing) and others 2. Assemble scheduling, costing, thermal analysis and output documentation in the model of a building 3. Recognize the limitations and future prospect of BIM technology
Arch 5163 Leadership and Management in Architecture 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: The course enables the students to learn essential leadership skills, including inspiring and motivating individuals, managing talent, influencing people without authority, and leading multidisciplinary professional/non-professional teams. It includes learning to create a shared vision for a team, effectively communicate it to the teammates and setting effective goals and expectations in a way that best enables the team to attain the shared vision. It also enables students to understand the most important needs and drivers of performance across cultures, and to align rewards with desired behaviors so that the teammates are motivated to attain the team’s objectives. Course Objectives: The course intends to: 1. Develop and maintain a strong orientation to the future and a commitment to improvement and innovation in creating and establishing new carrier path and achieving performance excellence. 2. Learn solid techniques for organizing and implementing complex plans and projects. 3. De
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: After completion of the course students are expected to: 1. Determine emergent social, environmental, organizational, and ethical complexities leaders must address in the 21st century. 2. Apply leadership theory and practice to challenges and opportunities for organizational excellence. 3. Evaluate leadership results from the perspective of multiple and diverse stakeholders. 4. Develop a deeper understanding of one's leadership beliefs, values, and strategies with consideration to the Scholar-Practitioner-Leader model.
Arch 5166 Digital Fabrication Lab 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: With the increasing sophistication of CAD and other design software, there is now a wide array of means for both designing and fabricating architecture and its components. The proliferation of advanced modeling software and hardware has enabled architects and students to conceive and create designs that would be very difficult to do using more traditional methods. Digital fabrication is establishing itself as a core discipline for architecture. It promises to close the gaps between digital technologies and the physical construction process. The benefits of digital fabrication are evident: efficient use of production resources, material-specific design concepts and constructive durability. Through a multidisciplinary approach the disciplines of architecture, structural design, robotics, and material and computer sciences are brought together to establish digital technology as an essential part of future building processes.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To bring together multiple disciplines such as architecture, computer science, structural engineering, etc. as an essential part of future building processes. 2. To explore the technologies for fabrication of building components. Intended Learning Outcomes: After completion of this course the students are expected to 1. Adapt their lessons for designing and fabricating architecture and its components. 2. Apply advanced modeling software and hardware to conceive and create designs that is difficult to do using traditional methods. 3. Synthesize multidisciplinary knowledge to have hands-on experience to fabricate different building components.
Arch 5168 Parametric Structures 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: This course will examine the concept of parametric systems and their applications in and implication on architecture. Through a series of lectures and guided design exercises students will be introduced to the theoretical background and logic of parametric systems and the generation of them in the digital environment. Historical building precedents of specific architectural typologies will be examined to open up a critical dialogue between existing physical constraints and the digital realm. Different design techniques will be studied and deployed in order to generate several parametrically driven prototypes that have the capacity to form innovative architectural structures.
Section B: Course Objectives: 1. To examine the concept of parametric systems and their application in and implication on architecture. 2. To introduce the theoretical background, logic of parametric systems and generation of them in the digital environment. Intended Learning Outcomes: After completion of this course the students are expected to 1. Criticize and adapt different design techniques in order to generate several parametrically driven prototypes that have the capacity to form innovative architectural structures. 2. Analyze historical building precedents of specific architectural typologies to build up critical thinking on existing physical constraints and the digital realm.
DS 5161 Theories of Development 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Study including theoretical perspective of classical and neoclassical economics, Keynesianism, neo-liberalism, modernization theory, dependency theory, world systems theory, neo-Marxism, institutionalism, post-structuralism, post-colonialism, and post-developmentalism. Course Objectives: 1. To examine the origins of development as an idea, goal and practice. 2. To explore debates about development in theory and practice as well as the role of these theories and debates in shaping the contemporary world. 3. To explore different roles of development actors, and the debates about their role and impact. 4. To develop critical understanding of the different ways in which poverty has been understood and the implications of those differences.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Gain a background in the various factors that shape current approaches to and debates on international development. 2. Use empirically formed analysis to identify gaps and tensions in the literature and academic debates. 3. Compare and contrast ideas and theories, and use those theories in the construction of arguments related to development. 4. Engage in critical discussion and debate in a group, and to formulate ideas based upon key readings.
ES 5161 Environmental Design and Urbanism in Global South 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Introduces relationship between the urbanization process and the environment in Global South and the concept of sustainable development in the context of rapid urbanization. Explores the urban planning regimes and their applicability to urban environmental management. It further analyses the context of provision of various infrastructure and services in limited and competing space from urban ecology perspective. Course Objectives: 1. To introduce dynamics of the urbanization process as global, regional and country trends. 2. To expose students to basic problems, cultural contexts, policy alternatives, and design solutions in the Global South. 3. To explore the challenge of informality and its implications for development. 4. To examine the environmental management strategy and the incorporation of different stakeholders.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Describe the dynamics of the urbanism and their environmental consequences. 2. Discuss the relationship between the urbanization process and the environment in Global South. 3. Describe the theoretical and practical paradigms in the urban environmental planning and management alternatives. 4. Criticize the current Urbanism practices in light of sustainable environmental design guideline in the Global South.
Arch 5212 Thesis-II 12 Credit
Section A: Course Content: In Thesis II, based on the Thesis I, students create design/design-support solutions/options as potential answer to the research question, which is subject to appraisal both by the stakeholders/user-groups/client and the members of ‘Panel of Appraisers’. Course Objectives: 1. Develop solid intellectual base of knowledge in theory, context, technology, the social environment, and professional practice to resolve design issues through independent thinking. 2. Co-create program as the projective, effective, performative, or intentional dimensions of the thesis that are to produce and sustain particular consequences.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: After completion of the course students are expected to: 1. Position design problems to the proposition being advanced in relation to contemporary professional and academic discourse. 2. Critically analyze various cultural, technological, social, natural, economic, and other conditions from users perspective. 3. Exercise design process with the techniques and modes of research brought to bear on the topical area of design issues. Transform the programmatic intentions of the thesis into physical form including a detailed specification of the manner in which the propositional or projective intentions of the thesis would be realized in specific or prototypical form.
Arch 5224 Thesis Colloquium 3 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Student-initiated design investigation, developed with a thesis supervisor. Develop research topics, review relevant research, frame research questions and arguments, choose an appropriate methodology for analysis, and draft conceptual understanding and method of design research. Course Objectives: 1. To explore, deduct and design of student-selected research topic. 2. To define an individual position of student with regard to a specific aspect of the discipline of architecture. 3. To incorporate research, programming, and site definition within design process, and present a written essay that discusses the development of the work.
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course, students will be able to 1. Accumulate knowledge and skills to develop a 13 weeks long design research. 2. Acquire the necessary skills for architectural research and analysis. 3. Formulate critical positions through readings, lectures, design studio research, and cross-disciplinary discussions.
Arch 5261 Professional Practice 2 Credit
Section A: Course Content: Architecture both defines and is defined by social, cultural, political and financial constraints: this is where the discipline and the profession of architecture meet. This mutual influence occurs wherever interventions in the built environment are considered and can be strengthened or undermined by the many ways in which the practice of architecture can be undertaken. This course is designed relies on the combination of taught and professional experience related modules which aim to develop student’s awareness, knowledge, understanding and skills in the professional practice and management of architecture. The course is delivered through a series of lectures and seminars on key issues relating to the professional, legislative and financial contexts of design and construction, as well as examples of and strategies for conventional and unconventional models of practice in preparation for the next stages of work experience and professional qualification. Course Objectives: 1. To develop a
Section B: Intended Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will be able to – 1. Prepare themselves equip in a professional environment. 2. Communicate propositions, processes and outcomes to address specialist and non-specialist audiences. 3. Achieve leadership within their discipline as well as collaborate with others. 4. Design develop and manage projects to meet client objectives, working collaboratively to achieve organizational and personal goals.